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Ex-Raider Aldon Smith transferred to inpatient rehab center

Ex-Raider Aldon Smith transferred to inpatient rehab center Ex-Raider Aldon Smith transferred to inpatient rehab center Copyright 2018 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. Copyright 2018 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Authorities say Aldon Smith is being transferred to an inpatient substance abuse treatment center as he awaits his next court date. The former Oakland Raiders and San Francisco 49ers linebacker was booked into jail a week ago for violating a condition of his electric monitoring while out on bail. According to court testimony, Smith had a 0.40 blood-alcohol level when he showed up at the sheriff’s department. Alex Bastian, a spokesman for the San Francisco district attorney’s office, said Friday that the order for Smith to remain in custody in rehab has no end date. Smith’s next court date is May 3. Smith pleaded not guilty last month to domestic violence and other charges stemming from an incident in early March. A judge issued a protective order prohibiting him from contacting the victim. He later surrendered to police on my website charges he violated the restraining order. The Raiders released Smith after his arrest on the domestic violence charges.

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Writers and Their Drugs of Choice Arthur Rimbaud’s long poem “A Season in Hell” was influenced by opium addiction, critics often suggest that he was writing about the horror of detoxification when he wrote “Night in Hell”. Reading this in college I was struck by the emotional starkness the work, Rimbaud writes in a way that demands courage of the reader, “My guts are on fire. The power of the poison twists my arms and legs, cripples me, and drives me to the ground. I die of thirst, I suffocate, I cannot cry.” Other notable poets that struggled with addiction include Romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley who was addicted to the liquid opium of the time laudanum, a struggle shared by Charles Baudelaire, who once wrote, “You have to be always drunk. That’s all there is to it—it’s the only way. So as not to feel the horrible burden of time that breaks your back and bends you to the earth, you have to be continually drunk. But on what? Wine, poetry or virtue, as you wish.” More on Baudelaire and his mood and mind altering preferences below. The Beat Generation openly cited drug use as and to aid in composition and legitimized the practice in that they produced great works. The Poetry Foundation writes that “Allen Ginsberg stated “that some of his best poetry was written under the influence of drugs: the second part of Howl with peyote, Kaddish with amphetamines, and Wales—A Visitation with LSD. While I wouldn’t recommend his methods, it’s hard to argue with Ginsberg’s results: his “angelheaded hipsters burning for the ancient heavenly connection to the starry dynamo in the machinery of night” are a part of the American literary canon.” The Romantic poet composed the hypnotic ‘Kubla Khan’ one of his most famous pieces after waking from an opium induced stupor in which he’d dreamed of the stately pleasure-domes of a Chinese emperor, Coleridge’s addiction finally killed him in 1834. The autobiographical account of his addiction ‘Confessions of an English Opium Eater’, published in 1821, brought De continue reading this Quincey fame, Baudelaire widened the readership in 1860 when he published a French translation ‘Les paradis artificiels’. Baudelaire was an established member of the Club de Hachichins (Hashish Club), which met between 1844 and 1849 and counted Alexandre Dumas and Eugène Delacroix among its numbers. Baudelaire wrote on hash, ‘among the drugs most efficient in creating what I call the artificial ideal… the most convenient and the most handy are hashish and opium.’ Robert Louis Stevenson, suffering from the effects of tuberculosis and medical cocaine wrote ‘The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde’ (1886). As his wife, who hated the book and tried to destroy it, noted, ‘That an invalid in my husband’s condition of health should have been able to perform the manual labour alone of putting 60,000 words on paper in six days, seems almost incredible.’ In ‘The Doors of Perception’, (1954), Huxley recounts at length his experience on the hallucinogenic mescaline which is to be found in the Peyote cactus. The book is the inspiration behind Jim Morrison’s band name ‘The Doors’. Burroughs used his experience of addiction as inspiration throughout his writing, most notably in Junkie (1953) and Naked Lunch (1959). The great sci-fi writer, author of ‘Do Android’s Dream of Electric Sheep’ – the adaptation of which is of course Blade Runner, the new version of which is currently showing) Philip K Dick’s intensive use of speed and hallucinogens inspired much of his work. It is said that his use of Semoxydrine – similar to speed – fueled his epic production of 11 sci-fi novels, essays and short stories all in the space of one year between 1963 and 1964. You could argue that credit for the amazing works of these authors should be given to the chemicals that they used to facilitate their writing, but that would be doing the writers a great disservice.

http://drug.addictionblog.org/writers-and-their-drugs-of-choice/ how does inpatient alcohol detox work how does inpatient alcohol detox work

Methadone helps people remain abstinent from opioids by reducing withdrawal symptoms and craving for the drugs. However, the medication doesn’t work equally well for all patients. New research indicates that a genetic difference may be one reason why. Drs. Richard C. Crist and Glenn A. Doyle from the Center for Neurobiology and Behavior at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and colleagues focused on the OPRM1 gene as a locus where variation in the sequence of DNA might affect responses to methadone and buprenorphine. OPRM1 encodes the μ-opioid receptor, where all opioids, licit and illicit, including the two opioid agonist medications, exert their effects on the brain. If a variant in OPRM1 were to suppress the gene’s expression, reducing the quantity of receptors available, those effects might be reduced accordingly. Drs. Crist and Doyle and colleagues hypothesized that if such an OPRM1 variant existed, its suppressive effect might occur in the messenger RNA (MOR-1) transcribed from the gene. The researchers observed that MOR-1 contains an unusually long 3’ untranslated region (3’ UTR) (see Figure 1), and other research had linked lengthy 3’ UTRs in other genes to expression-suppressing mechanisms. Figure 1. Schematic Representation of the mRNA (MOR-1) Transcribed From the OPRM-1 Gene The MOR-1 regions that translate into the μ-receptor protein are shown in purple; the untranslated region are in gray. The arrows indicate the locations of the four SNPs in the 3’ untranslated region of the mRNA that were analyzed in the studies. rs10485058 was associated with differing responses to methadone, but not to buprenorphine.

https://www.drugabuse.gov/news-events/nida-notes/2017/08/variation-in-gene-m-opioid-receptor-may-influence-responses-to-methadone